ART BYTE 14 – LICHTENSTEIN DUCK

Artists get inspiration from different sources , including the work of other artists. The subject of my next series of paintings will be a Pekin duck painted in the styles of some famous artists. Walter (pictured below) was adopted from a university lab, lived a cushy life in my back yard and will now be immortalized in paint.

Photo of Walter Duck
Photo of Walter Duck

My first portrayal of Walter Duck is in the style of Pop Artist Roy Lichtenstein. He became famous in the 1960’s for his DC Comics inspired paintings.  His process was to crop the part of the comic he wanted, render it in Ben-Day Dots and add  speech and thought bubbles containing tongue-in-cheek humor.  His most iconic work is Drowning Girl which you can see at the Museum of Modern in New York (or you can just click on the title and take a look at it.)

Deanna Williamson, Lichtenstein Duck, 5"x 7", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Lichtenstein Duck, 5″x 7″, acrylic on canvas, 2016

It was fairly easy to put Walter into a comic book design but impossible to paint the little round dots perfectly. Lichtenstein used stencils.  I traced my dots through the perforated surface of a rolling cart, and then painted them one by one.  Good thing for me this was only 5″ x 7″.

DAILY PAINTING 51- FAREWELL CAKE

Deanna Williamson, Farewell Cake, 6"x 6", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Farewell Cake, 6″x 6″, acrylic on canvas, 2016

The piece of cake in the painting above was from a farewell party I went to recently. I’m posting it as my farewell to the series of blog posts about the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson. Since the first post in February I have completed a total of 142 small paintings, including artist trading cards and bookmarks. So farewell, Mark Daniel Nelson.  I enjoyed blogging about your book and I learned a lot from it.

Now I’m ready to move on to some other topics.  Future posts will be titled “ART BYTE” because they will be short informational articles about various media, styles, and artists.  These articles will be illustrated by some of my original work. Some posts may contain reviews of art books and online art galleries.

I’ll also be adding some gallery pages to this site, putting some of my work up for sale, and activating a subscription service for followers who would like to get e-mail notices about new posts.

My hope is that visitors to therightpink.com will find it inspirational, educational,  and entertaining.

 

DAILY PAINTING 50 – PILE OF CANDY

Pile of Candy painted like the example in the book 50 Small Paintings. 6" x 6", acrylic on canvas
Pile of Candy painted like the example in the book. 6″ x 6″

The painting above is my 50th  and final painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson. The objective of this lesson was to paint a complicated arrangement of objects by starting out with generalized shapes and working your way down to little details.

When I first started looking for a model for extra practice, I shopped around for some colorful candy. Then I realized that I would probably be tempted to eat that candy afterward, so I settled for some little colorful wooden shapes that I had on hand in the studio.

Deanna Williamson, Eye Candy, 6" x 6", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Eye Candy, 6″ x 6″, acrylic on canvas, 2016

I was okay with the way this turned out but I’d still like to paint something else wrapped in cellophane like the candy in the example. Maybe some sugar-free Life-Savers. Or a giant lollipop! Or maybe some Peeps! Or chocolate-covered cherries!

DAILY PAINTING 37 – CLOTHESPIN

Clothespin painted like the example in the book 50 Small Paintings, 6" x 6"
Clothespin painted like the example in the book, 6″ x 6″

The painting above is my 37th painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson. This lesson is about rendering intricate details.  The intricate detail in this object is the wire spring.

Common objects like clothespins are good for practice in painting and drawing.  It’s actually reminiscent of the Pop Art of the 20th century which often featured this type of mass-manufactured object as subject matter. Pop Artist  Claes Oldenburg actually created a 54 foot tall sculpture of a clothespin.

For my study, I used a little 5 inch tall wooden manikin. A manikin is a jointed model of the human body. I thought it fit in with the wooden clothespin, but it was a bit more challenging to render because of the curved surfaces.

Little Manikin, 7"x 5", acrylic on canvas, 3-28-16
Little Manikin, 7″x 5″, acrylic on canvas, 3-28-16