CRAFT BYTE – SOFT SCULPTURE

Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom, 5 inches tall, made of socks, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom, 5 inches tall, made of socks, 2016

In the 1960’s Pop Artist Claes Oldenburg began creating sculptures out of non-rigid materials such as cloth, plastic, and foam rubber. Think giant plush hamburger. This became known as soft sculpture and has continued to be popular. Google soft sculpture and you will come up with a myriad of results including how-to instructions for practically any kind of object.

Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom, 5 inches tall, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom, 5 inches tall, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom 2, 5 inches tall, socks, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom 2, 5 inches tall, socks, 2016

My mushrooms are not as big as Oldenburg’s hamburger but they don’t take up nearly as much space.

ART BYTE 12 – MUSHROOMS AND MUSHROOMS

Deanna Williamson, Mushrooms 1, 6" x 6", watercolor, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Mushrooms 1, 6″ x 6″, watercolor, 2016

Here are the last two mushroom paintings I did while on vacation with the kiddies. The big red cap in Mushrooms 1 was a challenge because of the little white dots on the top.  These had to be left unpainted. Some masking fluid would have come in handy here but I didn’t have any with me. (Confession: I’ve actually never tried masking fluid.)

Deanna Williamson, Mushrooms 2, 6" x 6", watercolor, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Mushrooms 2, 6″ x 6″, watercolor, 2016

Mushrooms 2 is the final in this series and, in my opinion, the best.

Like the first 4 mushroom paintings, these were done from copyright free photos I found on Pixabay.

ART BYTE 11 – MORE MUSHROOMS

Deanna Williamson, Mushroom 3, 6" x 6", watercolor, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Mushroom 3, 6″ x 6″, watercolor, 2016

In the previous post I showed the first two in a series of paintings of mushrooms.  Those were done with watercolor crayons. However, I felt that the texture of the paper was too rough for the crayons, and since I didn’t have any smoother paper with me I decided to do the next ones with some regular water color paints.

Deanna Williamson, Mushroom 4, 6"x 6", watercolor, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Mushroom 4, 6″x 6″, watercolor, 2016

Since the texture of the paper doesn’t stand out so much on these, they look more natural than the first two in spite of their unusual colors. Mushroom 4′ s color is a bit exaggerated but Mushroom 3 is actually that color of blue.

The models for these mushrooms came from a copyright free image site called Pixabay.

ART BYTE 10 – MUSHROOMS

Deanna Williamson, Mushroom 1, 6" x 6", watercolor crayon, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Mushroom 1, 6″ x 6″, watercolor crayon, 2016

Recently I decided to try out some watercolor crayons I’d bought for my grandchildren.  I had in mind to use some bold colors and make a really bright and cheery mushroom. Mushroom 1 above is the result. It looks kind of like a child’s drawing which could be the result of making art with children – or – it could be the medium.

So for Mushroom 2 below, I tried using local color for a more natural look but I didn’t like the texture created by the watercolor crayons on the rough paper.

Deanna Williamson, Mushroom 2, 6" x 6", watercolor, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Mushroom 2, 6″ x 6″, watercolor, 2016

Both of these paintings were done from the same mushroom photo which I found on a copyright free site called Pixabay. I highly recommend it as a resource for images.