DAILY PAINTING 30 – POPPY FIELD

 

Poppy Field painted like the example in the book 50 Small Paintings, 6" x 6"
Poppy Field painted like the example in the book, 6″ x 6″

The painting above is my 30th painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson.  This lesson is about massing multiple objects into groups to create a more unified whole. The example was hard to paint because it was basically just copying brushstrokes. I changed it a bit from the one in the book in order to clarify the shapes of the flowers. These are Oriental Poppies.

I chose a different type of poppy for my own painting below. These have a different type of center and come in a variety of pinks. I love the white edging around some of the petals. However, as usual, my brushstrokes are overworked. I think I would have to paint a lot of poppies in order to get it as casual looking as Mark Daniel Nelson’s.

Deanna Williamson, Poppy Field, 5" x 7" acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Poppy Field, 5″ x 7″, acrylic on canvas

I also did a bookmark and an artist trading card for this post.

 

Deanna Williamson, Poppy, Bookmark, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Poppy, Bookmark, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Poppy, Artist Trading Card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Poppy, Artist Trading Card, acrylic on canvas

DAILY PAINTING 24 – DRIP PAINTING

Drip Painting painted according to the directions for the example in the book 50 Small Paintings, 6" x 6"
Drip Painting painted according to the directions for the example in the book, 6″ x 6″

The painting above is my 24th painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson. This lesson is about redefining the brushstroke, but to me it is more about how this type of technique has redefined what it means to be an artist.

In the past century, the definition of what constitutes an art work has become so vague that not many people could say for sure what it is. As an art teacher, I had to come up with a working definition to use in class and it is this:  if a thing involves the act of conscious designing on the part of a human being, it is art.  It may not be good art but it is art.  This definition eliminates accidents and animal art – although those make good-selling novelties.

Drip painting is a form of Abstract Expressionism called Action Painting that embraces a variety of methods other than brushes to get paint on canvas.  My favorite action painter was the Japanese artist Shozo Shimamo who filled balloons with paint and fired a small hand-made cannon at them.  Anyway, the idea behind all of this experimentation was that the act of painting was more important than the resulting product, an idea which has gained a foothold in our culture.

Also people have become more accepting of the products of Abstract Expressionism.  For example a blog called doiydesign.com has some nice looking products for sale called Pollock Trend. They have such items as cooking pots and tennis shoes all beautifully decorated with spattered paint.

Jackson Pollock – also known as “Jack the Dripper”  is most famous for the drip technique although he wasn’t the first artist to employ it in his work.  He would lay a large canvas on the floor, drip paint on it until he was satisfied, cut out the part he liked best and stretch it onto a canvas. So here’s the question: Is that art?  Based on my definition above, it is, simply because he chose the colors, he decided where to drip the paint, and he chose the final composition. Is it good art? That’s a matter of great contention among art lovers.

Below are a few of my “experiments” with drip painting.  The author recommended staying with analogous colors to make the work more unified.

Deanna Williamson, Pinkish, 6" x 6", acrylic painting on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Pinkish, 6″ x 6″, acrylic painting on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Bluish, 5" x 7", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Bluish, 5″ x 7″, acrylic on canvas, 2016

My problem with this sort of reduction is that it’s taken away the uniqueness of what it means to be an artist because “anybody can do it,” right? Used alone, the drip technique is accessible to anyone.  However, there are some like Henri Lamy who have incorporated it into their work as a successful textural component. I put it in the background of my cat painting below.  Actually these are more like spatters than drips but it’s hard to make small drips on a 5″ x 7″ canvas.

Deanna Williamson, Meeps, 5" x 7", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Meeps, 5″ x 7″, acrylic on canvas, 2016

This is sweet Meeps who is sojourning with us until his family takes him to Texas.  I used a palette knife to paint the cat and then masked him off and spattered his surroundings.

Here are couple of notes about the process.  First, I had to order a special brush from Blick– an egbert which is a filbert with really long bristles. You don’t have to have one to drip paint but it helps because it’s really floppy. Second, drip painting takes longer than you  might think because of drying time between layers. Third, once you get started doing this, it’s hard to quit! Below are some more- but not all – of my experiments.

Marbled looks like marbling, but it was made by turning a bunch of almost empty bottles upside down in a dish drainer over a piece of canvas and letting the paint drip and flow wherever it wanted.

Deanna Williamson, Marbled, 6" x 6", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Marbled, 6″ x 6″, acrylic on canvas, 2016

I employed an eyedropper to help with Flower Drops and manipulated the drops with toothpicks to create the star-shaped centers of the flowers.

Deanna Williamson, Flower Drops, 7"x 5", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Flower Drops, 7″x 5″, acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Reddish, 7" x 5", acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Reddish, 7″ x 5″, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Sun Drops, bookmark
Deanna Williamson, Sun Drops, bookmark

 

 

DAILY PAINTING 13 – BARN AND PASTURE

Barn and Pasture painted like the example in the book 50 Small Paintings, 6"x 6"
Barn and Pasture painted like the example in the book, 6″x 6″

The painting above is my thirteenth painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson.  This lesson is about layering cool over warm colors.  Whether you are layering cool over warm or warm over cool, this technique can liven up what might be an otherwise dull color scheme.

While painting the examples for some of these lessons, I have had to make some adjustments in color to get results that look like the ones in the book.   I don’t know if the discrepancies are due to color changes made in the publishing process or to the fact that I’m probably using cheaper paint. In this case I had trouble getting the right green for the pasture. You can see remnants of two greens where I painted over it a couple of times. Anyway, if you decide to get the book and paint the examples, don’t be discouraged if your results don’t line up exactly with those in the book.

For my version, I looked for a similar type scene, settling for this one with a house, and a large tree in the foreground.  I tried to emphasize the look of bright sunlight by keeping the foreground very dark in contrast to the light greens surrounding the house.

Deanna Williamson, House and Tree, 6"x 6", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, House and Tree, 6″x 6″, acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, House and Tree, 6"x 4", acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, House and Tree, 6″x 4″, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, House and Tree, Artist Trading Card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, House and Tree, Artist Trading Card, acrylic on canvas

For those who might not be familiar with artist trading cards, these are   2 1/2″ x 3 1/2″original artworks.   About 20 years ago someone in Switzerland came up with the idea to make these and trade them online as a fun way to get hold of some original artwork.. Since then, online sites have been created just for that purpose. There are also auction sites where collectors can purchase them. (When for sale they’re referred to as ACEO’s or Art Cards, Editions, and Originals.) Although there are ready-made frames for them, collectors often store and display them in the same type pocket pages used for baseball cards. This is because the artists often write interesting things on the backs.

Deanna Williamson, House and Tree, bookmark, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, House and Tree, bookmark, acrylic on canvas

DAILY PAINTING 7 – MISTY MOUNTAINS

Misty Mountains painted like the example in the book 50 Small Paintings, 6"x 6"
Misty Mountains painted like the example in the book, 6″x 6″

The painting above is my seventh painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson.  This lesson is about value – the lightness or darkness of a color.

In lesson 4, Deep Blue Sea, the color of the sea changed gradually from dark to light as it goes toward the horizon. This effect was achieved by blending paint directly on the canvas. In this painting the different values are mixed on the palette and then applied to the canvas creating separate shapes of differing values.  I highly recommend using a palette knife instead of a brush to do that kind of mixing.

Two things I’d like to mention about this painting: first, the use of atmospheric perspective to create a sense of spatial depth.  The concept is simple: if you want something to look farther away, make it lighter with fewer details.  That’s because our air is not perfectly clear.  It’s full of dust particles and vapor that gradually obscure things that are far away from us. Most people notice this when looking out over a mountain range, but the effect is everywhere, even looking across a pasture. It also varies with the weather and time of day.

The other thing I’d like to address is the rendering of edges around shapes.  The use of soft or hard edges in a painting can make a difference in the overall mood or feeling. I think the author used hard edges in his example so that the learner only needs to concentrate on mixing different values. However, softly blurring the edges of the peaks would have created a mistier effect on these mountains.

Unfortunately I didn’t think about that until I started writing this post so I don’t have an example with soft edges.

Deanna Williamson, Misty Mountains, 6"x 6", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Misty Mountains, 6″x 6″, acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Misty Mountains, 6" x 4", acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Misty Mountains, 6″ x 4″, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Misty Mountains,artist trading card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Misty Mountains,artist trading card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Misty Mountains, bookmark, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Misty Mountains, bookmark, acrylic on canvas

DAILY PAINTING 6 – BREAD AND BUTTER

Bread and Butter painted like the example in the book 50 Small Paintings, 6" x 6"
Bread and Butter painted like the example in the book, 6″ x 6″

The painting above is my sixth painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson.  This lesson is about applying a simple glaze. A glaze is a translucent layer of paint applied over a paint layer that has already dried in order to modify it in some way. It may be used to make the underlying layer look darker, lighter, or duller. Or it can change the actual hue.  For instance, applying a thin coat of red over yellow will make it look orange. In this lesson the application of the glaze over the bread and butter seems to be for a softening effect which I thought looked very nice.

In previous posts I have mentioned the importance of creativity – doing something original in a work of art, and that is why I’ve been doing an extra painting for these posts that is at least slightly different from the author’s example. To achieve some originality in my personal versions so far, I have only been adding details to the author’s idea or rearranging some his elements.  This time I tried to think of a completely different subject that would still fit the recommended color palette and glazing technique.  Below are my two resulting artworks. These eggs don’t look very appetizing but they fit the bill.

Deanna Williamson, Fried Egg, 6" x 6", acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Fried Egg, 6″ x 6″, acrylic on canvas, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Fried Egg, Artist Trading Card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Fried Egg, Artist Trading Card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Fried Egg and Bacon, bookmark, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Fried Egg and Bacon, bookmark, acrylic on canvas

The bookmark is actually a cut out canvas shape.  I had to scan it on black paper so that the top edge of egg white would show up on this background.

Sometimes, being creative just involves doing something you love. Because of my cholesterol issues I only get to eat actual fried eggs once a week.  Saturday is “egg day” at our house and we like them lacy edged, with a side of crispy bacon and buttered toast.  Pleasant thoughts create nice visual images and fun art work.

 

DAILY PAINTING 4 – DEEP BLUE SEA

Deep Blue Sea painted like the example in the book 50 Small Paintings, 6" x 6"
Deep Blue Sea painted like the example in the book, 6″ x 6″

The painting above is my fourth painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson.  This lesson introduces simple gradations – specifically, gradation of value created by blending different colors of paint together on the canvas while the colors are still wet.

Value is the lightness or darkness of a color.  Changes in value are created by adding white or black to the pure hue ( color).  Gradation of value, (also called blending or shading) is used to create different effects in an artwork.  For example, it can make an object look three dimensional.

The purpose of gradation in this lesson is to create a sense of spatial depth. In this case it makes the beach look close and the horizon look far away. Having the blue get darker also conveys a sense that the water gets deeper as you go farther from the shore.

The book gives a good explanation about the problems and solutions associated with blending in a medium like acrylic that dries quickly. As you can see from the example above, my transitions are not perfectly smooth.  The importance of smooth gradation depends on your subject and the level of realism you want to achieve. For example, if I were trying to accurately depict the surface of a rounded object like a china cup or an egg, the transition from light to dark would need to be more even than what I have achieved here.

Below is my own version of Deep Blue Sea in which I’ve tried to exercise some personal creativity. (See note on creativity in the prior post)  Sometimes you only need to make a few changes in order to make something your own.  In this example, I just changed the shape of the shoreline and added some little details.

Deanna Williamson, Deep Blue Sea, 6" x 6", acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Deep Blue Sea, 6″ x 6″, acrylic on canvas

I liked this subject well enough to use up the leftover paint on the smaller versions below.

Deanna Williamson, Deep Blue Sea, 6" x 4", acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Deep Blue Sea, 6″ x 4″, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Deep Blue Sea, Artist Trading Card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Deep Blue Sea, Artist Trading Card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Deep Blue Sea, bookmark, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Deep Blue Sea, bookmark, acrylic on canvas

DAILY PAINTING 2 – SIMPLE SUNSET

Simple Sunset painted like the example in the book 50 Small Paintings, 6" x 6"
Simple Sunset painted like the example in the book, 6″ x 6″

The painting above is my second painting exercise from the book Learn to Paint in Acrylics with 50 Small Paintings by Mark Daniel Nelson.  Like the painting from the prior post the objective is basic paint application. This time the palette includes color ( hue ) as opposed to just black and white. However there is no mixing  (changing of value or intensity) – you just use the paint as it is right out of the tube.

The painting below is my own version of Simple Sunset.  I call it Desert Sunset.

Deanna Williamson, Desert Sunset, 6" x 6", acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Desert Sunset, 6″ x 6″, acrylic on canvas

I used the author’s process and prescribed color palette but made this painting into a desert sunset by adding a cactus and some scruffy looking grass.  While looking at reference photos of sunsets, I noticed that sometimes the colors form an arc around the sun like a fiery rainbow. So I did that in my version of the painting and blended the colors on the canvas while they were still wet. Blending actually doesn’t come up in the book until Lesson 4 but I couldn’t resist.

By the way, all 50 of paintings in the book are 6″ x 6″, a popular size with daily painters. (More about that later.) You can get canvases of this size on Amazon  as well as at art supply stores like Hobby Lobby and Michael’s and even at Walmart.  They come pre-stretched or on cardboard. I’m just using some floor canvas I had on hand.

One other thing: since I always tend to dispense too much paint I decided to use the left overs and do a  6″ x 4″ painting, an artist trading card and a book marker.

Deanna Williamson, Desert Sunset 6"x 4", acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Desert Sunset 6″x 4″, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Desert Sunset, artist trading card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Desert Sunset, artist trading card, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Desert Sunset , bookmark, acrylic on canvas
Deanna Williamson, Desert Sunset , bookmark, acrylic on canvas

This kept me from wasting the extra paint and canvas scraps, provided some additional practice, and left me with some items to give away and (ahem) sell.