CRAFT BYTE 8- SOCK ALIENS

Deanna Williamson, Sock Nerd, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Sock Nerd, 2016

Sock Creature purists may think that Sock Nerd is not a true sock creature because his body is made of a pot holder. However since the pot holder was made out of loops cut from actual socks, Sock Nerd would, in fact, be a true sock creature.

Furthermore, although some nit pickers may object to Sock Nerd being referred to as a sock creature instead of a sock person, in my opinion nerds are actually creatures. (from outer space.) My opinion is, of course, based on close encounters with arch nerds (single-minded experts in a particular field) including some software developers.

It is perfectly obvious, however, that Sock Alien is definitely an alien, (note the antennae) although not necessarily a nerd.

Deanna Williamson, Sock Alien, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Sock Alien, 2016

 

CRAFT BYTE – SOCK KITTIES

Deanna Williamson, Sock Kitty, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Sock Kitty, 2016

Whereas the sock creatures in the previous posts were more original in form, the kitties above and below, were made using conventional patterns. In order to get some originality into them I appliqued hand dyed scraps on to them and embellished with embroidery.

Deanna Williamson, Fabulous Sock Kitty, 2016,therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Fabulous Sock Kitty, 2016

CRAFT BYTE – SOFT SCULPTURE

Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom, 5 inches tall, made of socks, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom, 5 inches tall, made of socks, 2016

In the 1960’s Pop Artist Claes Oldenburg began creating sculptures out of non-rigid materials such as cloth, plastic, and foam rubber. Think giant plush hamburger. This became known as soft sculpture and has continued to be popular. Google soft sculpture and you will come up with a myriad of results including how-to instructions for practically any kind of object.

Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom, 5 inches tall, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom, 5 inches tall, 2016
Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom 2, 5 inches tall, socks, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Soft Sculpture Mushroom 2, 5 inches tall, socks, 2016

My mushrooms are not as big as Oldenburg’s hamburger but they don’t take up nearly as much space.

CRAFT BYTE – TIE-DYED SOCK CREATURES

Deanna Williamson, Milo, sock person, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Milo, sock person, 2016

In a previous post I introduced my new interest in creating sock creatures. Since I was recycling old socks for some of my creatures I started tie dying the the white ones to add color and originality. I also used bleach on old black socks to get some interesting effects.  Milo was made out of some hand dyed socks as were the dress and hair of the doll below.

Deanna Williamson, Sock Doll, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Sock Doll, 2016

Below are a recently tie dyed / tie bleached batch of socks. It will be interesting to see what can be made from them.

Deanna Williamson, tie-dyed socks, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, tie-dyed socks

CRAFT BYTE – CHRISTMAS ORNAMENTS

Deanna Williamson, Ornaments, recycled paper, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Ornaments, recycled paper

These paper ornaments were made from toilet paper which had been draped all over a high school class room as part of a homecoming prank.

For those not familiar with the customs of American high schools, each year there is one special football game to which alumni are invited. Festivities include a formally dressed court, dances, and parties, etc. An unintended but fairly common side activity is a form of practical joke called “rolling yards”. This is the act of draping people’s property with rolls and rolls of toilet paper. It’s usually taken with good humor provided there is no serious or permanent property damage.

When my colleagues’ class room was “rolled”, it seemed a shame to throw away all that paper. So we bagged it up and recycled it into Christmas ornaments.

The process is simple: dip a wad of paper in some water and pack it into cookie cutters.  It will dry into rigid shapes that can be popped out, primed and painted.  Glue on a hanger and you’re done.

We made a lot of these, sold them to students and teachers and used the proceeds to purchase school supplies and uniforms for a child through Grace International World Outreach.

Moral of the story? Don’t get mad. Get busy. Have fun!