ART BYTE 33 – COLORED PENCIL

Deanna Williamson, Sun, 6 x 6, colored pencil, 2017,therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Sun, 6 x 6, colored pencil, 2017

Recently my son bought me a set of Prismacolor™ colored pencils. I started experimenting with them using some little outline designs I already had in a sketch book. Being wax-based they blend smoothly, but the tooth in my paper allowed a lot of texture and tiny little white spots to show through. You can see it in the version above.

So I went over it with a blending pencil. This covered most of the white spots and gave a smoother appearance as you can see in the version below.

Deanna Williamson, Sun, 6 x 6, colored pencil blended, 2017,therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Sun, 6 x 6, colored pencil blended, 2017

However, while cropping the scanner versions for this post, I noticed that the color – particularly the pinks – seemed washed out, and some texture still came through even though it’s almost invisible in the original.  So I decided to see if a photograph would show the artwork better. The version below was photographed with the camera on my Android phone.

Deanna Williamson, Sun, 6 x 6, colored pencil blended 2, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Sun, 6 x 6, colored pencil blended 2

As you can see, the textures are more subdued. However in the camera version, the color changed. The oranges and yellows are now more saturated than in the original and the blue-green is not green at all. I played around with the color tools in Gimp trying to get color truer to the original but everything I did to one color altered the other ones as well. I’m nowhere near an expert at using editing software, but this brings up and interesting problem in publishing artwork online or even in books.

Compare, for example. these versions of Monet’s Impression Sunrise.

Impression, sunrise, 1873 - Claude Monet   Image result for impression sunrise claude monet

Image result for impression sunrise claude monet   "Impression, Sunrise"

There are many more of them online. I prefer the one on the top which came from Wikiart. However the important thing is not which version I prefer but what the artist intended it to look like. The only way you can know for sure is to go to Paris and see it for yourself.

ART BYTE 34- SGRAFFITO

Deanna Williamson, Pepper 2, 5 x 7, acrylic on canvas, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Pepper 2, 5 x 7, acrylic on canvas, 2016

Sgraffito is an art technique that involves scratching through a layer of paint or other media to reveal a contrasting color beneath. Historical applications include painting, pottery, and glass, but the definition also applies to drawing media like scratch board, crayon and oil pastel etchings.

In this acrylic portrait of my conure I’ve used sgraffito to liven up the background. The process was simple: I put down a layer of paint, let it dry, then put on a thicker coat and used a pointed stick to scratch designs into it while it was still wet.

CRAFT BYTE 5 – STARFISH

Deanna Williamson, Starfish, 17 x 27, latchhooked rug, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Starfish, 17 x 27, latch hooked rug, 2016

Here is another latch hooked rug made of recycled t shirts.  I made it for a friend of mine who loves everything marine.  She says her cats are enjoying this rug.

Below is a detail of the starfish. I hooked in extra strands into it to make it look more defined.

Deanna Williamson, Starfish detail, 17 x 27, latch hooked rug, 2016, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Starfish detail, 17 x 27, latch hooked rug, 2016

 

ART JOURNALING 3 – WE’RE OFF TO SEE THE WIZARD

Deanna Williamson, 2017 Journal Page 1, 8 x 5.5, mixed media, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, 2017 Journal Page 1, 8 x 5.5, mixed media

In the previous posts on art journaling, I used some of my first pages. However, my process has evolved over the years, so for this post I decided to jump ahead and show some more current ones. The top one is not the first one for 2017 but it is about the event that set the tone. It illustrates a tornado that tore through our neighborhood and changed many people’s lives forever. My house is the one with the big tree at the bottom. I cut the title words out of a newspaper and made the tornado and stormy sky with crayon and watercolor resist.

The page below is built around a failed drawing.  After gluing and writing things around the face, I unified the whole by filling in with colors that repeat the colors in the collaged elements.  It’s all random which makes it a totally laid back way to make some art, record some thoughts, and preserve some memorabilia.

Deanna Williamson, 2017 Journal Page 2, 8 x 5.5, mixed media, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, 2017 Journal Page 2, 8 x 5.5, mixed media

ART JOURNALING 2 – WINDOWS

Deanna Williamson, Art Journal Page 4, 11 x 8.5, mixed media, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Art Journal Page 4, 11 x 8.5, mixed media

Art journal pages can be created using the same techniques that are used in the creation of altered books. The pages on this post are an example. The above, for instance, contains a window that gives a partial view of the image on the following page.  I even put cellophane over the opening to give an illusion of glass. Turn the page and you see the complete image as shown below. That image was made by gluing in a photo of a frog and then drawing the imaginary tree roots it’s sitting on. If you look closely you can see the borders of the photo.

Deanna Williamson, Art Journal Page 5, 11 x 8.5, mixed media, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Art Journal Page 5, 11 x 8.5, mixed media

These pages are about six years old, so I don’t remember why I chose to put the frog behind bars. I probably just wanted to create a page with a window in it and then added the frog later, centering it to fit. Anyway, I like the willow tree with its roots on the mossy knoll.

ART JOURNALING 1

Deanna Williamson, Art Journal Page 1, 11 x 8.5, mixed media
Deanna Williamson, Art Journal Page 1, 11 x 8.5, mixed media

Several years ago I read an article about an artist who created art journals throughout her career.  When she passed away the Smithsonian American Art Museum bought them from her sons. That was the first time I’d seen the term art journal, but since then I’ve seen dozens of books about it and the internet has been inundated with images of art journal pages. Anyway, I loved the idea and immediately began to create my own.

Basically, an art journal is a sort of illustrated diary. The possibilities for creating them are endless. My own process is to fill a sketch book page with doodles, sketches, notes, quotes, ideas, inspirational quotes, and glued in daily ephemera. I also try to finish mine with some unifying element.  For example the one above is unified with the color red. I achieved that with tissue paper, fabric netting, watercolor and various kinds of pens.

The page below is unified with the color yellow and also with curved lines.

Deanna Williamson, Art Journal Page 2, 11 x 8.5, mixed media, therightpink.com
Deanna Williamson, Art Journal Page 2, 11 x 8.5, mixed media

I doubt the Smithsonian will be interested in my journals. Maybe they’ll wind up in my kids’ attics, a garage sale, or a trash bin. Whatever becomes of them, they have been an interesting and satisfying experience.